No more backend coding: Stamplay simplifies app development

Stamplay is a browser-based web application creator that allows developers to dramatically reduce backend coding. This is done by connecting multiple components, assigning actions to those components, then coding-up the frontend in any way you want.  Developers can create full stack apps with only client-side code, by building fully functioning applications without manually hooking up a bunch of APIs and writing a ton of backend code.  Software is eating the world, but today creating a web app is expensive and wastes a lot of time because it relies on so many things like infrastructure, API, integrating third-party services, building a backend to manage the data, logic, design the UX and UI and writing a lot of code.  Stamplay’s vision is to make software development like working with Legos – ultimately moving it towards a much more visual experience, without the need for so much backend code.

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An entrepreneur since he was 17, Giuliano Iacobelli is a software engineer who gets things done and loves the web. He had a web agency and became influential in the tech scene in Italy, spending some years after his master’s degree as a consultant and project manager in telcos, and later jumping into the startup game.  Giuliano and co-founder Nicola Mattina were tired of solving the same problems over and over again when building new software projects: services for backend coding were there to an extent, but they were just about data management and some server-side hosting.  Building a B2B software company from scratch, especially in a country with a major lack of capital, and a terrible environment for startups was definitely a challenge.  And building consumer relationships outside of Italy was even tougher.  But Stamplay is a bit of a success story: in a little over two years, the company has moved beyond its native country, with a consumer reach extending to places such as London and even the US.  Then again, the founders were always thinking internationally – having been incorporated as a UK company paid off within a year, when Stamplay entered Seedcamp, thus boosting their network abroad.  And since launching operations in October 2014, Stamplay has successfully secured over $350,000 in funding from across Europe.

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Stamplay streamlines the development and management of web applications, making most work a question of mere minutes, rather than days spent doing coding.  The service brings together building blocks and services API in such a manner that a developer simply needs to pick what they want and define rules for their application – for instance, when a user signs up for an application with Facebook, send them a welcome email and add them to the mailing list.  And therefore, the need to do all of this manually is drastically reduced.    After an app is up and running, the Stamplay platform stores its data and exposes the API to the developer, automatically generating backend code, allowing the developer to simply manage the data without additional hassles.  A developer needs only to deal with the UX and UI of their product, and the Stamplay team loves to say that they “let you build Rome in a day.”  Given the nature of their product, Stamplay’s target audience is mainly composed of developers.

Stamplay competes mainly with other backend data tools such as Parse, Firebase, Syncano, Hull, and Deployd Telerik.  Their expansion plans are to raise enough money to relocate to the US by the end of 2015, with a monthly fee charged to every active app developed using their services. Their goal is to reach 100,000 developers across the world, and have at least 10,000 apps built on their platform.

The first 10 readers from StartUp Dope who successfully launch an app on Stamplay will get a coupon for six months free on their most expensive plan, as well as t-shirts and stickers.


 

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  • I’m working on creating an app for our company, Tunicity. So far, it’s rather difficult to crack, for a noncoder like me.